A 26-year-old domestic worker was found in a queue – and sleeping on a street for about a week – in Whampoa in Kowloon in a bid to buy concert tickets.

Ta Kung Pao received information from a local citizen that a domestic worker was found staying outside the Tom Lee Music store on Wan Hoi Street in Hung Hom’s Whampoa for at least a week.

After observation on Monday and Tuesday, a reporter for the paper found that the domestic worker had been staying at the back-door area of the music shop for several days and nights. The retailer has a concert ticket counter at the shop.

The woman was seen to rush around when she went to a washroom or had her lunch and dinner, before returning to her spot. At night, she slept on pieces of cardboard on the street with a blanket over the top.

The reporter approached the domestic worker on Monday and was told she had been in the queue for “a few days” after a request from her “boss” to buy tickets for a concert next year by Taiwanese musician and singer Jay Chou.

The worker showed a photo of Jay Chou’s concert information. But the report did not mention the nationality of the domestic worker.

Police also received a report on Monday night that a non-Chinese woman, aged 26, had been staying on Wan Hoi Street for several days. Officers were told that she had queued for concert tickets. They classed the case as miscellaneous.

At 4:30am on Tuesday, a reporter saw a middle-aged woman talking to the domestic worker for 10 minutes, who later went into a building at Whampoa Garden. However, the relationship between the women was not clear.

The concert organizer said tickets for Jay Chou’s concert, which will be held in March 2018, would be available in early December via Urbtix counters and websites.

Staff at Tom Lee said they didn’t know the exact date of sale but people interested to get tickets could wait at the back door area until they are available.

Lawyer Albert Luk Wai-hung said if a domestic worker was not happy to queue up for tickets in such a manner – voluntarily – her employer could be prosecuted for aiding or abetting a worker to breach the condition of his or her stay.