As speculation swirls in Singapore around the format and content of the summit between US President Donald Trump and North Korean leader Kim Jong-un, an unlikely guest has made an appearance.

Dennis Rodman, the former NBA star, is taking advantage of his relationship with Kim and says he is in Singapore to help promote world peace. His attendance is funded by PotCoin, a marijuana focused cyrpto-currency designed to “facilitate transactions within the legalized cannabis industry.”

“Thanks to my loyal sponsors from @potcoin and my team at @princemarketinggroup, I will be flying to Singapore for the historical summit. I’ll give whatever support is needed to my friends, President Trump and Marshall Kim Jong-un,” Rodman wrote on Instagram.

The leaders are meeting on Tuesday on Sentosa Island and although it is unlikely that they will be indulging in anything more than a strong cup of coffee, PotCoin is maximizing to the full Rodman’s relationship with both leaders. Rodman has met Kim a number of times and has also appeared on Celebrity Apprentice, Trump’s former reality show, where the athlete misspelled Melania Trump’s name as “Milania” and was “fired.”

“The world is now one step closer to ‪#worldpeace‬. You’re welcome! ‪@realDonaldTrump‬, ‪@DPRK_News‬ ‪@dennisrodman‬ ‪#singapore‬ ‪#summit‬, #cryptocurrency” a tweet on PotCoin’s official Twitter account read.

While enjoying plenty of publicity, PotCoin is also aiming to take advantage of the burgeoning North American legal marijuana scene. As an indicator of the “green market’s” value, Deloitte recently estimated the Canadian legal recreational cannabis use market will be worth US$4.34 billion in 2019, with the medical cannabis market accounting for between $770 million and $1.79 billion, while the illegal market will increase $510 million to $1.04 billion.

“Legalization of recreational cannabis will create a new type of cannabis consumer who is older than today’s typical consumer – aged 35-54 versus 18-34 – better educated, university or graduate school education versus high school or college education, less of a risk taker and likely to consume cannabis less frequently, less than once a month versus several times a week,” Deloitte said in a press release for a June 2018 report entitled “A society in transition, an industry ready to bloom.”

The White House has previously tried to play down the former Chicago Bulls forward’s role, with spokesman Hogan Gidley telling Fox News last week that while he expected Trump and Kim to have “an amazing conversation,” they will be doing so “without Dennis Rodman in tow.”

Whatever Rodman’s role is in Singapore, he would be wise to note that being found guilty of possession or consumption of cannabis, under the city-state’s strict drug laws, could result in a maximum penalty of 10 years in prison, a hefty fine and also caning. Trafficking, import or export of more than 500 grams could result in the death penalty.

So maybe #worldpeacecanwait?

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