Do not take a job applicant from Asia as its face value. Especially in Hong Kong, where almost one in five curriculum vitae employers received was inaccurate, the highest in Asia.

That was according to background checking company First Advantage, which pointed out some 18% of resumes in Hong Kong were inaccurate, higher than Singapore (17%), Japan and South Korea (9.2%) and China (7.5%).

These inaccurate CVs are minor mistakes though, not candidates cheating on having been educated in an Ivy League college they did not attend, or summer jobs at top investment banks they only dreamed about getting.

Accordingly, one in 12 people would misstate their dates of employment or school.

One possible explanation from First Advantage was the candidate was trying to hide the between jobs period, or it was simply poorly memorized.

One in 19 people will misstate their titles. Apart from poor memory, another possible reason could be the job title varies between the external and internal reference.

Increasingly more employers were checking what is known as the financial CV, which most candidates would not put on their resumes.

Those contain information that consumer credit agencies collect, such as whether someone is paying an outstanding amount in due time or whether he borrows more than he earns.

According to TransUnion, which provides credit agency data to credit information reseller companies like First Advantage, employers asking for credit references went up 30% in 2017, compared to 2016, and tripled from what it was 10 years ago.

The eighth most common industry that would want a credit reference, which tells a candidate’s credibility and financial pressures, are banks, securities, IT outsourcing, medical, high-end consumer retail, cleaning, delivery and gaming.

These sectors always deal with sensitive or private information or deal with money matters. And employers want to make sure they are hiring the right person for these jobs.