The Pentagon’s decision on Monday to send warships through the Taiwan Strait for the second time since July was more evidence that the Trump administration, while not crossing any lines that haven’t been crossed in the past, is determined to demonstrate a commitment to its role as guarantor of Taiwan’s security.

Advocates for deeper ties with Taipei have gained influence in the administration of US President Donald Trump and have succeeded in increasing the frequency of arms sales to Taiwan and getting legislation passed to encourage US government officials to visit counterparts in Taiwan.

While these policy shifts have drawn the ire of Beijing, Taipei is reportedly hoping to capitalize on what Su Tzu-yun, a senior official at a think-tank backed by Taiwan’s Defense Ministry, called “a strategic window of opportunity,” according to the Financial Times.

As part this effort, Taiwan’s Institute for National Defense and Security Research is preparing to propose at the US-Taiwan defense industry conference next week that Taiwanese chipmakers provide technology for US and NATO F-16, F-15 and F-18 aircraft.

It was also reported on Monday that Taiwan is planning to share information regarding incidents of Chinese hacking with the US.