More than a dozen industries have threatened to call a strike for next Monday and Tuesday to push the Hong Kong government to reply to the five demands of protesters by Saturday, the end of the month.

The protesters’ five demands have come from the anti-extradition bill movement in Hong Kong over the past two months.

Between September 2 and 3, many people from different walks of life would stop working if the government continued to turn a deaf ear to the people, the city’s public broadcaster RTHK reported.

A sit-in protest would be called for in Salisbury Garden in Tsim Sha Tsui, Kowloon, and in Tamar Park in Admiralty, Hong Kong, from 1:30pm on Monday, and would be extended until the next day, tentatively scheduled at Chater Garden in Central.

Applications to authorities for a Letter of No Objection covering both days of public meetings and processions have been filed by the Hong Kong Confederation of Trade Unions.

A total of 21 sectors, including allied health, dentistry, social welfare, information technology, insurance, retailing, logistics, construction, engineering, aviation, banking, finance, accounting, advertising, marketing, music, arts, design and culture, and hotel and tourism said they would advise their members to go on strike if the government failed to reply by August 31.

Meanwhile, the Hong Kong Secondary Students Union also announced that students from more than 90 schools across the city would be joining a class boycott starting from September 3.

If there were no positive replies from the government in two weeks, escalating actions would be expected from September 13.

Education chief Kevin Yeung Yun-hung on Thursday afternoon issued a letter appealing to all parents in the city not to permit their children to participate in dangerous or illegal activities, such as joining class boycotts.

Peer bullying against those whose parents are members of law enforcement in schools should be discouraged, he added.