Bugatti is again turning to its history for design inspiration.

The Centodieci, unveiled at Monterey Car Week, is a tribute to the EB110, Bugatti’s sports car from the 1990s, before Volkswagen Group acquired the exclusive French brand, Automotive News Europe reported.

The resemblance to the EB100 is prominently seen at the front of the Centodieci with similar lines and Bugatti’s horseshoe grille, which the automaker said was reduced in size for the model.

“We are proud of our long Bugatti history, of which the EB110 is very much a part,” Bugatti President Stephan Winkelmann said in a statement. “That’s why we’re celebrating a reinterpretation of this extraordinary vehicle with the Centodieci – Italian for 110.”

Based on the Chiron, the Centodieci is powered by a 8.0-liter, W16 engine with 1,600 hp. Bugatti said the car can hit 62 mph in 2.4 seconds. As with the EB100, the engine can be seen under a transparent glass surface, the report said.

Bugatti said it will build only 10 Centodiecis and the allotment is already sold out. Each car cost over 8 million euros (US$8.8 million), before taxes. The 10 models will be delivered in two years, the automaker said.

According to CNN Business, the EB110 was built in Northern Italy’s “Motor Valley,” not far from where Lamborghini, Ferrari and Maseratis are made. It was an attempt to revive the Bugatti brand, which had been dormant since the 1950s. The Centodieci’s design recalls the EB110s low, aggressive appearance.

The Centodieci can hit 62 mph in 2.4 seconds. As with the EB100, the engine can be seen under a transparent glass surface. Handout.

That business ultimately failed, but the automobile it created is still regarded as one of the greatest supercars ever made.

The prototype for the EB110 was designed by Carlo Gandini, the same man who designed the Lamborghini Countach. The final production versions of the car were designed by Giampaolo Benedini, who was also an avid racing driver.

Volkswagen Group purchased the Bugatti brand name in 1998 and built its modern production facility at Bugatti’s ancestral home in Molsheim, France. With the backing of one of the world’s largest automakers, Bugatti now makes fast cars for the extremely wealthy, much as it did in the first decades of the 20th century.

The body of the Centodieci is designed to be reminiscent of the low, wide stance and wedge-like shape of the EB110, the report said.

“Transporting this classic look into the new millennium without copying it was technically complex, to say the least,” said Bugatti designer Achim Anscheidt.

The Centodieci’s horizontal headlamps set into the hood mimic those of the EB110, but they’re narrower and more aggressive thanks to modern LED technology.

Instead of the Chiron’s swooping C-shaped lines around the big side vents, the Centodieci has openings with straight edges and a cluster of round holes.

The Centodieci also has a permanently raised rear wing, unlike the Chiron’s wing, which can be lowered so that it lays against the car’s body. Both those features — the vent holes and raised rear wing — were drawn from the Bugatti EB110 SS, a very high performance version of that car.

The body of the Centodieci is designed to be reminiscent of the low, wide stance and wedge-like shape of the EB110. Handout.